Friday, July 6, 2012

July 6: Wow! Evergy industries, corruption,...

....government and regulators on the take, tremendous dangers, death toll unpredictable.....a government-apppointed, expert panel tells terrible story of the betrayal by government, the corruptiong of inspectors and regulars, and the corrupting influence of evergy companies.

No, no, no. It didn't happn here. I mean, this is New Brunswick. Here, we have trusted names like Alward and Northrup and Irving and SWN. No. It couldn't happen here. I mean, just look at the NB record. We've had fracking going on here for a dozen years - and we haven't even needed regulations or inspectors. But nobody's worried. Here, we all know we can trust Alward and Northrup and Irving and SWN, and Corridor

For reassurance, take a look at today's p. C6. There's a big picture of the CEO of Corridor. Nice-looking guy, well-dressed with a nice. white shirt and tie. Respectable, you know. But he's no snob. You can tell that with him just sitting there with no jacket,  just a regular guy sitting relaxed and and leaning forward - you know, friendly-like  - in just a regular chair . And behind him, there's big map of the Atlantic provinces. So he's, you know, down home.

And what he says is the debate on shale gas is too narrow. We should also be discussing potential benefits of shale gas. You know - there could be some regular jobs in this for a few years. We gotta figure that in. I mean, sure, you poison the soil and the water for generations to come. You poison wildlife and fisheries. You maybe make some people sick and even dead.

But, hey, think about that weekly pay cheque. Think of that new car you wanted. Yeah. you need a balance.

Oh, I know. A dozen years after fracking began seems late to suggest all this. But, hey, he's been busy. And just looking at that picture, you know you can trust him.

That picture and story made the Moncton Times and Transcript in a big way. What didn't make it was the story from Japan. Funny how those sharp editors at the TandT could miss it. It was right there in Google News, just a click away.

A panel of experts appointed by the Japanese government investigated the combined effects of the tsunami and the nuclear reactor breakdown that has exposed all of Japan (and much of othe world) to highly dangerous levels of radiation. It's not too much to say these is panic in Japan, and that those who can get out are leaving that country.

Now, the panel has reported. The disaster was preventable. The tsunami wasn't preventable. But the readiactive disaster was. The reactor had fundamantal flaws in it that were well know years ago.. Nothing was done. The regulations were inadequate. The regulators looked the other way. The owners of the energy companies didn't want to pay for the necessary work. The government knew all about it - and didn't do a thing.

As a result, people in Japan are getting sick and dying. The radiation is showing up in the soil, in food that is grown in the soil, in food that is canned, in markets and convenience stores. It will last, in practical terms, forever.

And it gets worse.

All the nuclear plants in Japan have the same flaws. In all cases, the flaws have been ignored by coorporations, regulators, and government.

And not a word about this appeared in the Moncton Times and Transcript, the paper which was repeatedly pledged itself to keep us informed about the energy debate.

Luckily, we have a fine and intelligent premier in Mister Alward, and we're thinking about regulations.  We've been thinking about them for a dozen years, and even thinking of enforcing them. We have Mr. Irving with a foot in the energy industry and another in the news media; so we know we'll get full and honest coverage of the whole story. We live in a province with no history of collusion between government and big business.

And we have the CEO of Corridor, who doesn't go all swell with a jacket, and who leans forward in his chair when he looks at us. Jes' folks. Probably didn'teven know his picture was being taken.

And, of course, you have balance the risks with those new jobs that might happen, and that new car you've always wanted.

Meanwhile, I'll think of my brother-in-law, his Japanese wife and their children who fled their home in Japan to come to Canada - and to wonder for the rest of their lives whether they got out in time.

Norbert is still on a ranting string, this one full of wild generalizations, prejudices, and ignorance of both eudcation and government which doesn't prevent him from making thunderous statements about both. .On the op ed page, Suzuki, as always, knows what he's talking about.

There is a letter to the editor defending Crandall University's right to break the law. I won't waste time arguing about that. But I do notice this issue of Crandall appears to be the only intervention of any church in this town in the real, daily world we live in.

I am struck by the number of massive and expensive churches in this city, quite magnificent, and most built just about a century ago.

I am struck by how few go to them, and by how many seem to be abandoned.

I am struck by their failure to be involved in discussions of the day which, it seems to me, have clear moral implications. The only ones who seem to be involved in a moral issue are the Baptists - and they seem to have done a rather patchy reading of The Bible. The same section that denounces gays calls for public stoning of them, and public stoning of disobedient children.

I mean, think of the possiblities. This could be a big tourist draw with stones at a dollar each. Talk about a city that punches above its weight.

Or - all the Baptist preachers and university administrators in this town should check out Luke 6:42.

For those other big churches, I can see why they're empty. Being Christian should mean something more than sanding around and clapping hands for Jesus.

Meanwhile, the big push is on. It's obvious that opposition to shale gas is too widespread to just run over it. We're not in for a new sell, especially orchestrated for the Irving press. We have to talk about the benefits aspect. Yeah. That's it. Think about that paycheque yoo might get. For a while.

2 comments:

  1. MORE JOBS! MORE JOBS!

    .....maybe.........

    I gotta ask maybe what? Jobs in the petroleum industry @ Alberta wages, OH! don't be silly. Ok then, how many, @ sub-standard wages, EXACTLY (best estimate, give, or take, say, 100) OH! I guess I'm being silly again.

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  2. Anonymous, have you not read the man's blog ??
    « I mean, sure, you poison the soil and the water for generations to come. You poison wildlife and fisheries. You maybe make some people sick and even dead. » and « As a result, people in Japan are getting sick and dying. The radiation is showing up in the soil, in food that is grown in the soil, in food that is canned, in markets and convenience stores. It will last, in practical terms, forever.»
    And all you're thinking about are JOBS ?? Are jobs more important that our water, our air, the earth ?? There is NO WEALTH on a dead planet...All the money in the world won't be able to save you when the environment will be destroyed...think about that instead of being silly...

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